"Loading Up" on Certifications

 

Logistics and Warehouse Management is a prosperous industry.  Cumberland Perry AVTS is preparing its students with the proper certifications to be a first class pick of employers in this job market.  For the 2018-2019 school year, two new certifications are being offered to students in this program area. 

The first is a Certified Logistics Associate certification that is being offered to level two students in the second semester.  This is self-paced computer based credential for students that is used by material handlers across all supply chains.  Course modules include topics such as global supply chain, material handling equipment, quality control, work place communication, teamwork, computer usage, and problem solving.  With this certification, entry level salaries range from $26,000-$48,000. 

NSC Lift Truck Operator is a certification also being offered.  Every Logistics student in year one at Cumberland Perry AVTS may take this two week course in the first semester.  This is a crucial job skill to have in the logistics industry.  Students will learn operating principles, safety inspection, worksite inspection, trailer loading, and safe forklift driving.  

OSHA 10 General Industry certification is offered to the logistics students as well.  It is a ten hour course that introduces occupational safety while teaching employees to detect preventable work hazards.  This course outlines flammable liquids and gasses, electrical hazards, chemical hazards, and basic elements of safety and health. 

Cumberland Perry AVTS is empowering their students with credentials necessary to be successful in the Logistics and Warehouse Industry. 

Cooperative Education Spotlight- Jordan Sipe

coop spotlight- Oct 2018

Jordan Sipe, a senior from Northern York High School, leaves school every day at 11:00 and heads to work at Lower Allen Township. As part of the Cooperative Education program, he is capping off his vocational education with some valuable hands on training. After 2 years of Automotive Technology classroom and shop floor training at CPAVTS, the transition to the world of work has been a smooth one for Jordan. Each day brings a new adventure for him at the township maintenance building. Township police cars, dump trucks, leaf blows, street sweepers, snow blowers, to mention a few, are all part of Jordan’s responsibility to keep up and running. Engine diagnostics, overheating issues, electrical problems, vacuum leaks, brake replacements are all part of the daily task list. Jordan states that he loves the wide variety of jobs he performs and it keeps every day exciting. With his mechanical aptitude and personal drive, Jordan’s success doesn’t come as a surprise to anyone!

Program Spotlight- Automotive Collision Technology

Teacher Spotlight- Mr. YaukeyProgram Spotlight- ACT 2018

What is the most significant new or different aspect to your program this year?

“The total number of students accepted in my program has gone up this year.”

What are some of the more common career pathways your students take when they leave CPAVTS?

“Many students go into local body shops as body shop technicians or attend college to gain more knowledge in automotive collision repair.”

What particular training/unit do employers seek that helps student get their foot in the door?

“Most employers want students to have the ability to do body work to a damaged car and have the ability to learn and grow in the field.”

What is some of the recent technology and/or trends in the profession with which students become familiar?

“Students are learning about brake assisting, cars parking themselves, cars self-driving, and cars having lane assistance.”

What unit/topic do students struggle with the most in your program? Why do you think that is?

“Automotive electronics. It is just a higher level of thinking and learning.”

Explain a typical day in your program.

“Students walk into the class room and sit down for theory, after theory is over they then apply what they have learned in the classroom setting to what they are accomplishing on the shop floor.”

What advice would you give students who have completed your program?

“Life has its bumps along the way, drive over them!”

How many years have you been at CPAVTS?

“I have been at CPAVTS for six years.”

What is your experience before coming to CPAVTS?

“I spent ten years as an automotive collision repair technician, working at various establishments; such as, A&A Auto Body, Willow Street, PA, Davidson Ford, Gettysburg, PA, Lady & Taylor, Gettysburg, PA and the Pennsylvania Fire Apparatus, Gettysburg, PA.”

October 2018- Rotary Students of the Month

SOM's Oct. 2018

Libby Bartlow is a West Perry High School student in the Nursing Program. She participates in a wide variety of school and community activities, including membership in the National Technical Honor Society, SkillsUSA and Vice President of HOSA (CPAVTS). She plays softball for West Perry and is a volunteer at the YMCA Summer Camp. She is currently employed by Pappaz. She made honor roll and was named student of the quarter at CPAVTS. Following her time at Votech she plans to attend Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) and then transfer to Penn State majoring in Nursing. She hopes to become a Nurse Practitioner or pursue a career in gynecology with her degree.

Dalton Kiner is a Big Spring High School student in the Computer Networking program. He is currently a member of SkillsUSA (CPAVTS) and is employed through the Cooperative Education program at CPAVTS. He participates with Marching Band and Musical Theater at Big Spring. He is currently employed by the Capital Area Intermediate Unit (CAIU). He plans to attend the Pennsylvania College of Technology or Pittsburgh Tech majoring in Information Technology, Computer Networking.

Hailey Ott is a Mechanicsburg High School student in the Culinary Arts program. She made honor roll and was named student of the quarter at CPAVTS. She is a member of both National Honor Society (Big Spring) and National Technical Honor Society (CPAVTS). She volunteers with the Silver Spring Community Fire Company, Dept. 31 and is currently employed with Red Robin Restaurant. She hopes to attend either IUP or YTI Lancaster majoring in Culinary Arts following her graduation.

Educationally Enriching Collaboration Experience

 collaboration

Did you ever wonder what it would be like to have an authentic Italian dinner?  Students at Cumberland Perry have created this ambience for the Joint Operating Committee members to enjoy for the first time at the September 24th meeting with a wood fired pizza oven.  This evening meeting meets monthly and brings board members from the 13 different districts whose students attend Cumberland Perry AVTS.

Four masonry students spent roughly 60 hours over a 3 week time frame designing, constructing, and accomplishing the largest pizza oven that has been completed by students to date.  It was student designed and built requiring 6 different tasks including a semi-circle arch opening.  The price for a pizza over varies beginning around $1,500, and the one constructed is estimated to be worth around $4,000.  The oven was originally constructed to accent other pieces Carpentry students built for the PA Home Builder’s Show.

Let us give you an idea of the tremendous amount of “teamwork” involved in this project.  Carpentry constructed the roof for the pizza oven.  After the 5 pitch roof was framed, the tin and drip edge were added to water proof the structure.  A level three senior finished the 50”x 58” roof in just two afternoons.  

A metal door was needed to finish the oven to keep the heat in but allow air gaps to keep the fire going.  Welding used a 1/8” thick piece of stainless steel to make the removable door.  Two students spent two afternoons designing the layout and implicating the finished door.  Chipping handles welded to 3/8” round stock steel make for an appealing architectural design.  Students used the plasma cam software to cut the arch opening out. 

But it doesn’t stop there….

Horticulture also cut and supplied the kindling used to maintain the fire and HVAC was able to lend their torch enabling culinary students to start the fire. 

Culinary students prepared the authentic Italian meal.  Tossed salad with Italian vinaigrette started the first of three courses.  The Joint Operating Committee members were given a choice of Margherita, meat lovers, Neapolitan, or garden vegetable pizza as the entrée course.  Dessert was a chocolate mousse accompanied by Pizzelles an Italian waffle cookie.  A pizza oven can get over 500 degrees, so the pizza must be spun every 10 seconds in order to prevent burning.  To fully cook a pizza takes only a few minutes. 

This was an “educationally enriching collaboration experience” for the six programs involved and a more than delicious treat for the JOC members.  “Buon Appetito!”